Tag Archives: Public lecture

PUBLIC LECTURE – 12 AUGUST 2020

Wednesday, 12 August 2020, 8:00 PM
https://utas.zoom.us/j/97801842637

A Space like no other : the past, present and future of Tasmania’s involvement in space

Professor Simon Ellingsen from University of Tasmania

As small island sitting on the edge of the Pacific and Southern oceans Tasmania has a view of the sky accessible to few others. Tasmania has a long association with the exploration of space and so when the Australian Space Agency was created in mid-2018, with the goal of tripling Australia’s slice of the rapidly growing international space industry, it was natural that our location and expertise be utilised as part of this bold endeavour.

In this talk I will give a brief history covering some of the past highlights of Tasmania’s involvement in space-related ventures, through to our most recent project to construct a dedicated satellite tracking station at the University of Tasmania’s Greenhill observatory. This facility has been funded by the Australian Space Agency and will support Australian innovation in both research and commercial space activities. The new tracking station will commence operation in 2021 and will provide a unique opportunity for Tasmanian researchers and businesses to leverage the benefits that access to space can provide.

Further details: Krzysztof Bolejko (krzysztof.bolejko@utas.edu.au)

PUBLIC LECTURE – 26 FEBRUARY 2020

Wednesday, 26 February 2020, 8:00 PM
Physics Lecture Theatre 1, Sandy Bay Campus, University of Tasmania

No qualms about quantum theory

Professor Berge Englert from Centre for Quantum Technologies (Singapore)

Quantum theory has been singularly successful in the almost one-hundred years since its foundations were laid by Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrödinger, Max Born, Paul Dirac, and others. Nevertheless, there is a debate – seemingly never ending – about the so-called “measurement problem” and other perceived problems. I shall argue that quantum theory is a well-defined local theory with a clear interpretation. No measurement problem or any other foundational matters are waiting to be settled. The answers to questions such as: What is a physical theory? What are the preexisting concepts in quantum theory? Probabilities in quantum theory are probabilities for what? What is state reduction? Do wave functions collapse? Is there instant action at a distant? Is quantum theory nonlocal? Where is Heisenberg’s cut? How many interpretations do we need? Is there a measurement problem? demonstrate the case.

Further details: Krzysztof Bolejko (krzysztof.bolejko@utas.edu.au)

PUBLIC LECTURE – 28 November 2019

Thursday, 28 November 2019, 6:00 PM
Physics Lecture Theatre 1, Sandy Bay Campus, University of Tasmania

The quest for new physics

Professor Raymond Volkas, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne

The standard model of particle physics is an extremely successful theory, but we know that it is an incomplete description of nature. I will review the evidence for “new physics”: interactions and particles that extend the standard model. The evidence ranges from the experimental detection of neutrino masses through the existence of dark matter to puzzles such as the lack of antimatter in the universe and various technical problems with big bang cosmology that may be solved by a period of cosmological inflation. I will also survey some other hints for new physics in the form of anomalous experimental results, and touch on some past disappointments in the quest for new physics. The conclusion will be that new physics certainly exists, and that a wide-ranging experimental and observational program is needed to discover its underlaying nature.

Further details: Krzysztof Bolejko (krzysztof.bolejko@utas.edu.au)

Public Talk: Biophysics at the nanoscale, one molecule at a time

Distinguished Professor Antoine van Oijen from the School of Chemistry and Molecular Bioscience, Molecular Horizons, at the University of Wollongong will be giving a public talk Thursday May 30th.

 

Summary of talk:

Advances in optical imaging and molecular manipulation techniques have made it possible to observe individual enzymes and record molecular movies that provide new insight into their dynamics and reaction mechanisms. In a biological context, most of these enzymes function in concert with other enzymes in multi-protein complexes, so an important direction is the utilization of single-molecule techniques to unravel the orchestration of large macromolecular assemblies. We are applying a single-molecule approach to study DNA replication, a process that is supported by a large, multi-protein complex containing a number of different activities. I will present recent results of single-molecule studies of replication in bacterial and eukaryotic systems, using approaches that rely on mechanical manipulation of individual DNA molecules and the visualization of the fluorescence of individual, labelled replication proteins. Using these methods, we study the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordination at the replication fork of the various enzymatic activities that support DNA unwinding, priming, and synthesis.

 

Brief Biography of the Speaker:

Antoine van Oijen led research groups at Harvard Medical School and Groningen University (the Netherlands) before moving to the University of Wollongong in 2015 as an ARC Laureate Fellow. His research revolves around the development and use of single-molecule biophysical tools to study complex biological systems. In particular, he is interested in understanding the molecular principles underlying the process of bacterial DNA replication and repair. Using novel single-molecule fluorescence imaging and nano-manipulation techniques, his work has allowed the direct visualization of the dynamics of individual replication and repair complexes and has led to new insights into bacterial genomic maintenance and pathways leading to antibiotic resistance.

 

Detailed Schedule for Thursday, 30th May 2019:

  • 5.30-6.00 pm REFRESHMENTS, University of Wollongong, Building 28, Room 101
  • 6.00-7.00 pm LECTURE by Distinguished Professor Antoine van Oijen
  • 7.30 pm DINNER with the Speaker at nearby Restaurant

E-mail Dr Fred Osman (fosman@bu.edu) to RSVP.

PUBLIC LECTURE – Why Should I Care About Physics? From Atoms to Cancer Therapy and More!

Dr Catalina Curceanu
National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Frascati, Italy
What a wonderful world! And how many different structures, from stars to human beings! We have learned about atoms, Higgs bosons, black holes and the Big Bang; we have internet, computers, satellites, GPS and so many amazing technologies! Who needs more? But how do they work? One may think we should not care about the physics beyond technology; it is not our business how technology works! But this is not true! Amazing things happen if we try to understand the physics behind our technology: GPS works due to…Einstein; computers work due to…quantum mechanics; we can cure cancer with particle accelerators. But even more important, we can explore the Universe – inside and outside us – because we are curious beings, we are all born physicists! The adventure of physics will last as long as humanity – we will never stop asking questions. Stay hungry, stay foolish? No! Stay curious. Albert Einstein once said: “I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious”.

Igniting stars with super intense lasers

FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
presented in conjunction with the
Women In Physics Group,
by the Australian Institute of Physics (SA branch) https://aip.org.au/category/sa/ Email: aip_branchsecretary_sa@aip.org.au

The Claire Corani Memorial Lecture
The South Australian lecture in the
2018 AIP Women in Physics Lecture Tour

at 6:30pm–7:40pm on Thursday 9th August 2018

in the Napier G04 Lecture Theatre
Napier Building, the University of Adelaide, North Terrace campus.

Abstract: When we press FIRE on the most powerful laser in the world,
we deliver a packet of light that is a thousand billion billion times more
intense than the sunlight you feel while out on Bondi beach in peak
summer! That’s super intense! We can use this extreme power to
recreate the conditions at the centre of Sun and in the process release
vast amounts of energy in a clean and safe way. Harnessing this power
for electricity generation is an inspiring story. It combines pure and
applied physics and requires engineering to handle the most extreme conditions in our solar system!

Biography: Ceri Brenner is a plasma physicist and innovator who uses the most powerful lasers in the world to study what happens when extreme bursts of light come into contact with matter and is using this knowledge to design new X-ray technology that can see through steel! The extreme physics she studies can also be applied for understanding supernova explosions in space or how we can ignite a star on earth for clean electricity generation.

The Claire Corani Memorial prizes, available for award to the top second-year female Physics student at each SA university in 2017, will be presented at the lecture.

AIP Women in Physics lecture – Macquarie University

Special Public AIP Lecture Event – at Macquarie University
“Innovation with the most powerful lasers in the world”

Each year the Australian Institute of Physics (AIP) funds a national tour by an eminent female physicist. This year’s AIP Women in Physics lecturer will be Dr Ceri Brenner, an experimental physicist from the UK. Ceri’s AIP lecture in Sydney is in partnership with the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Macquarie University.

Ceri Brenner is a plasma physicist and innovator who uses the most powerful lasers in the world to study what happens when extreme bursts of light come into contact with matter and is using this knowledge to design new X-ray technology that can see through steel! The extreme physics she studies can also be applied for understanding supernova explosions in space or how we can ignite a star on earth for clean electricity generation.

When Ceri shines the CLF’s super-intense lasers at a solid, liquid or a gas, they super-heat to millions of degrees in less than a trillionth of a second and rip apart the material structure to transform into plasma—the fourth state of matter.

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/aip-women-in-physics-lecture-dr-ceri-brenner-tickets-47341985152
Enquiries phone: (02) 9850 8959

Light for Extra-Sensory Perception

International Day of Light Public Lecture
by Professor Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem
Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS),
ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP),
The University of Adelaide

Abstract
Photonics is a disruptive technology whose impact and potential to transform
industry and our lives has been likened to those of electronics. We all use photonics enabled devices every day such as lasers, sensors and optical fibres, even without realising it. The global photonics market is currently worth around USD$500 billion and is expected to grow to over US$600 billion by 2023, which makes physics and photonics a very attractive prospect to join this locally and internationally growing high-tech industry.
This talk will explore the different approaches and devices used for harnessing light to measure the world around us, for example temperature, magnetic fields, gravity, corrosion and much more.

Biography
Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem received the Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the University of Jena, Germany, in 1994. She subsequently held two prestigious fellowships and received the Weyl International Glass Science Award in 2001. During 2001-2004 she was with the Optoelectronics Research Centre at the University of Southampton, UK. Since 2005, she has been with the University of Adelaide, Australia. Currently, she leads the Glass and Fibre Group and is the Deputy Director of the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing. Her research focuses on the development of novel optical glasses, fibres, surface functionalization and sensing approaches.

Public Lecture – Shedding Light on Dark Matter

Professor Chris Power of the University of Western Australia will review what the latest observations and numerical simulations are telling us about dark matter. He will also speculate on what we might learn in the coming years, especially as observation, theory, and experiment place more stringent limits on what the dark matter can be.

Public Lecture – From Mad Scientists to Eco-Warriors: The changing image of scientists in fiction and film

Adjunct Associate Professor Roslynn Haynes
School of English, Media and Performing Arts, University of New South Wales

For approximately 600 years, from 1380 to 1980, scientists or their predecessors, the alchemists and natural philosophers, fared ill at the hands of writers and, later, film makers.

They were obsessed to the point of madness, or evil, amoral, arrogant, impersonal, and inhuman. At best, they were well intentioned but blind to the dangers of forces they barely controlled. They were Faustus and Frankenstein, Jekyll and Moreau, Caligari and Strangelove – the scientists of film and fiction, cultural archetypes that reflected ancient fears of tampering with the unknown or unleashing the little-understood powers of nature.

Yet, since the 1990s, there has been a trend by novelists to present scientists as more complex, realistic figures, many honest and admirable even if confused as to their role. They are eco-warriors saving the planet, or medical researchers discovering new cures for humanity. However, in films, the mad, evil stereotype endures. What are the reasons for this disparity? What do they teach us about the difficulties scientists have in convincing politicians and large sections of society of the need to take environmental pollution and climate change seriously?