All posts by aipWPEditor

Mid-Year Dinner

Date And Time
Thu, July 18, 2019
6:30 PM – 10:00 PM

The SA Branch of the Australian Institute of Physics will be holding its mid-year dinner and awards night in Kipling’s Restaurant at the Bombay Bicycle Club on Thursday 18th July. Come along for an informal evening with your fellow physicist including students, academics and researchers. Drinks will be from 6.30 pm with the dinner commencing at 7.00 pm.

We will be presenting the Silver Bragg Awards to the top final year students who have completed a Bachelor of Science degree in 2018 with a major in Physics from the University of Adelaide and Flinders University. The 2019 SA Physics Teacher of the Year award will also be acknowledged.

Location
Bombay Bicycle Club
29 Torrens RoadOvingham, SA 5082

Cost: A La Carte (Kipling’s Restaurant Menu
http://www.bombaybicycleclub.com.au/assets/images/uploads/files/pdf/kiplings-jan-2018.pdf) – Pay on the night (no separate bills so paying by cash will be greatly appreciated)

AIP Summer Meeting; neutrons will save the world; foldable phones; jobs; and more physics in July

We are excited to announce that the AIP is running a Summer Meeting on 3rd – 6th December 2019 at RMIT University in Melbourne. The meeting aims to showcase the upcoming talent in physics and will offer career development opportunities for students and early career researchers, including a jobs fair and a brilliant scientific program. Details here https://aip-summer-meeting.com/

A group of Australian students are attending the 29th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany and they’re taking over our new AIP Instagram account. See what they’re doing here.

July 5th 2019 marks the International Day of LGBTQ+ People in STEM. I’m so proud to be the president of an organisation that supports diversity and inclusion in STEM. And take a look at our social media accounts that have gone rainbow for the day!

This month in our new Hidden Physicists section, we’re featuring Eliza-Jane Pearsall, who is loving her job as Assistant Director of Policy Analysis at the Department of Social Security. Get in touch if you’d like to nominate a ‘hidden’ physicist for us to profile. More below.

This month Harvard physicist Lene Hau will present ‘Nothing goes faster than light… usually!’ at UNSW on July 23rd. For August: Helen Maynard-Casely will tour the country to talk about how neutrons will save the world for the Women in Physics lectures; Pegah Maasoumi will be around Queensland, talking about Ironman’s suit and solar panel windows on the John Mainstone lecture tour; and Elisabetta Barberio will present the 2019 Einstein lecture exploring what we know so far about dark matter. Details below.

I am also very proud to say that we found two Australian physicists honoured in the Queen’s Birthday 2018 Honours list. Congratulations to Olivia Samardzic and Michelle Simmons! Olivia is a long-time AIP executive team member and looks after the AIP awards and medals, and Michelle of course is a quantum physicist and 2018 Australian of the Year. If you know of other physicists, please let us know.

We await the results of the South Australian Science Excellence Awards with shortlisted physicists Andre Luiten and James Tickner. Good luck!

In WA, hear from medical physicist Pejman Rowshanfarzad about the latest advances in radiotherapy machines at the WA Branch AIP General Meeting on Thursday 11th July. Register by emailing WA Branch Chair Dean Leggo.

Also this month: mentoring and guidance in careers (MAGIC) workshop for women ECRs, five of Australia’s brightest students to attend the International Physics Olympiad in Israel, apply for a role at CSIRO as an optical satellite systems engineer and more jobs in our Jobs Corner.

Finally, if you know someone considering becoming a member, let them know that now is an excellent time to join. From July 1st, new members pay only 50 per cent of the membership rates for the remainder of the year.

Continue reading AIP Summer Meeting; neutrons will save the world; foldable phones; jobs; and more physics in July

Canadian reciprocal rights for AIP members; Australian Academy of Science Awardees, the unravelling Great Red Spot; and more physics in June

I’m excited to announce that Nanotechnologist Tim Van der Laan will be joining the AIP team as our new Special Projects Officer for Outreach, focusing on digital content creation. Follow the new Instagram account at @aus_physics and send through your interesting and engaging physics pictures to Tim for posting on the account. Tim is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Queensland University of Technology, and he will work on ways to connect physicists with students and the broader community. Read about his plans below.

As well as our new Jobs Corner, this month we are introducing our ‘Hidden Physicists’ section, which profiles a physicist in the workforce. Our first profile is on ANU and UWA physics graduate Stuart Midgley, who now builds supercomputers at DownUnder GeoSolutions to process seismic data for mining companies.

In other good news we signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Canadian Association of Physics (CAP) in May. This is a fantastic achievement and allows AIP members to attend CAP Congresses at member rates, subscribe to CAP’s magazine and be invited to speak at CAP Congress. Congratulations to our hard-working secretary Kirrily Rule who is working to set up MOUs and reciprocity agreements with other physics societies around the world. The response has been very positive, so watch this space!

In May I had the pleasure of attending the Asian Physics Olympiad in Adelaide—the first time the event was held in Australia. Congratulations to the young physicists on the Australian team who competed in two five-hour exams – one experimental and the other theory-based. I also had the pleasure of speaking on ABC RN Breakfast Radio with Siobhan Tobin about the Olympiad, women in STEM and optics. Have a listen here and read more below

If you’re in WA, come along to the WA Branch AIP General Meeting on Thursday 11th July. Medical physicist Pejman Rowshanfarzad will be guest lecturer, speaking about the latest advances in radiotherapy machines. More below.

Also this month: Australian Academy of Science Honorific Awards, attend the last Girls in Physics Breakfast for the year, apply for a graduate position at the Bureau of Meteorology, Jupiter’s shrinking Great Red Spot, and the last chance to be a presenter at Physics in the Pub in Melbourne.

Kind regards,

Jodie Bradby
President, Australian Institute of Physics
aip_president@aip.org.au

Continue reading Canadian reciprocal rights for AIP members; Australian Academy of Science Awardees, the unravelling Great Red Spot; and more physics in June

The Evolutionary Map of the Universe

Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 at 8pm
Kerr Grant Lecture Theatre
2nd Floor, Physics Building
The University of Adelaide
North Terrace, Adelaide

The Evolutionary Map of the Universe

Professor Ray Norris
CSIRO Astronomy & Space Science &
Western Sydney University

Abstract: The m Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope is nearing completion in Western Australia. One of the key projects driving it is EMU – the Evolutionary Map of the Universe – which has an ambitious goal of studying the sky at radio wavelengths in unprecedented detail, boldly going where no telescope has gone before. Our scientific goal is to figure out how galaxies evolved in the early days of the Universe and how they evolve to the Universe we see today, with stars, planets, rocks, trees, and astronomers. What will we find? How will it change our view of how we got to be here? What is the role of black holes in regulating the growth of galaxies? And given that the most spectacular discoveries in astronomy are unexpected, we will be watching especially carefully for serendipitous discoveries that pop up in the data.

Bio: Professor Ray Norris is a British/Australian astronomer with CSIRO Astronomy & Space Science and Western Sydney University, who researches how galaxies formed and evolved after the Big Bang, and also researches the astronomy of  Aboriginal Australians. He frequently appears on radio and TV, featured in the stage show “The First Astronomers” with Wardaman elder Bill Yidumduma Harney, and has written the novel “Graven Images”.  He was educated at Cambridge University, and University of Manchester, UK, and moved to Australia to join CSIRO, where he became Head of Astrophysics in 1994, and then Deputy Director of the Australia Telescope, and Director of the Australian Astronomy Major National Research Facility, before returning in 2005 to active research. He currently leads an international project (EMU, or Evolutionary Map of the Universe) to understand the origin and evolution of galaxies, using the new Australian SKA Pathfinder radio-telescope nearing completion in Western Australia, and is also pioneering the WTF project to discover the unexpected in astronomical data.

Free – visitors welcome –  booking not required (*Please note – university security locks entrance doors at 8pm sharp*)

 

February VIC Branch Event

On 11 February 2019 at the School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Prof. Elisabetta Barberio spoke about Australia’s contribution to discovering the Higgs Boson and future experimental research on detecting dark matter such a WIMPs. We also learned that bananas are a potent source of background radiation!

It was poetic that Prof. Barberio spoke on the International Women In Science Day as she is the first female Australian Institute of Physics Walter Boas Medal recipient.

Victoria’s Lead Scientist, Amanda Caples also showed her support by attending the talk and congratulating Prof. Barberio on her Boas Medal afterwards.
AIP-Feb2019-51126586_2535178313176558_4946797504508198912_Prof. Elisabetta Barberio, Boas Medal Winner (Hercus Theatre, Uni. of Melb.)

AIP-Feb2019-52120225_2536250253069364_862112898242052096_nDr Gail Iles (AIP Vic Branch Chair), Prof. Elisabetta Barberio (Uni. Melb.), Dr Amanda Caples (Lead Scientist Victoria)

106 Halifax St, Adelaide, SA, 5000
12th of March

Physics in the Pub

Workshops and Talks / Cabaret
SA/ACT
Scaled fiona panther cropped
Grab a drink and a snack in a relaxed pub environment and listen to local physicists talking & laughing about their research.

Eight snappy physics acts, 8 minutes long from scientists working on astronomy, quantum physics, geophysics and more. Be prepared for comedy, songs, live experiments and heavy duty research.

MC Dr Phil Dooley from Phil Up On Science will keep you entertained and guide you through mind blowing concepts and brain boggling discoveries.

Sponsored by Australian Institute of Physics.

Presented by:
Local Physicists, MC Dr Phil Dooley

From childhood dreams of being an astronomer, Dr Phil Dooley progressed to a PhD in laser physics. After a stint as an IT trainer, he returned to science as a communicator, where he could talk about the fun stuff without the heavy-duty equations.

He regularly MCs Science in the Pub events, and has performed solo in shows and festivals from Adelaide to London, blending music, stand up comedy, fairytales and live science demos. He runs a YouTube channel, Phil Up On Science.

In has career he has taken on bored teenage school kids on physics excursions at University of Sydney; created digital content for the international fusion research organisation, JET; been schooled by a Reuters hack in the ANU media and written for prominent science publishers Nature, New Scientist and Cosmos Magazine.

WA 2019

The WA Branch started the year with a committee meeting at a local Italian restaurant. We plan on running our regular events and a few new activities. Become a member and stay tuned.
The 2018 AIP Congress was held in Perth and was a great success. Thank you to everyone involved and who attended. We had a lot of interest from high school teachers, and we are hoping to engage this community.
The first event is our March General Meeting, more details soon. Below are some of the regular events we will be hosting.
  • General Meetings – presenting work from the Physics Community
  • National Women in Physics Lecture Series
  • Post-Grad Conference
  • Our Fine Dining AGM
Group photo around Restaurant table
Chair: Dean Leggo,
Vice Chair: Mitchell Chiew and Tristan Ward
Treasurer:  Drew Parsons
Secretary: Andrea F. Biondo
Committee: Kirsten Emory,  Philipp Schönhöfer, Kathryn Wilson, Justin Freeman, Loughlan Weatherly, Diana Tomazos, John Chapman, Marjan Zadnik, and Gerd Schröder-Turk

Bronze Bragg Presentation and Free Public Lecture

Thursday 28th of February 2019 at 6.30 to 7.45 pm
Napier 102 lecture theatre, 1st floor, Napier Building
University of Adelaide

Optical Tweezers ‘Demystified’

Assoc. Professor Bruce Wedding

University of South Australia

Since their invention 32 years ago, optical tweezers have become a powerful tool utilised in a wide variety of experiments in biology and physics. Optical tweezers use light to trap microscopic objects as small as 10 nm using radiation pressure from a focused laser beam. These trapped particles can then be manipulated and forces on the particles in the trap can be measured. The first designs of optical tweezers used high power lasers and expensive optical hardware. Recently however, simple and inexpensive apparatus for undergraduate laboratories can produce a single beam optical tweezer to trap micron-sized particles. Such a system in undergraduate laboratories and the resulting student engagement will be presented.

Interest in microfluidics is also a rapidly expanding area of research and the use of microchips as miniature chemical reactors, so called ‘Labs-on-a-Chip’ is increasingly common. Microfluidic channels are now complex and combine several functions on a single chip. Fluid flow details are important but relatively few experimental methods are available to probe the flow in a confined geometry. We can use optical trapping of a small dielectric particle to probe the fluid flow in microfluidic channels.

Rather than using the optical trap to position and release a particle for independent velocimetry measurement, we map the fluid flow by measuring the hydrodynamic force acting on a trapped particle. The flow rate of a dilute aqueous electrolyte flowing through a microchannel has been mapped using a small (1 µm diameter) silica particle. Such flow mapping is time efficient, reliable, and can be used in low-opacity suspensions flowing in microchannels of various geometries.

The Bronze Bragg medals and certificates will be presented at the lecture. The medal is awarded for highest achievement in Physics in 2018 in the SACE Stage 2 assessments, with certificates being for students who achieved a merit.

 The presentation and lecture will be held in the Napier 102 Lecture Theatre, Napier Building, 1st floor, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, north from Pulteney St., at 6.30pm. Members of the public are warmly invited to attend. We are obliged for security reasons to keep the front door of the building attended, so please arrive before 6.30pm. Bookings are not available. The doors must be closed if all seats are taken.

Enquires: Email via aip_branchsecretary_sa@aip.org.au  mob: 0427 711 815.

2019 Victorian Branch Committee

Happy New Year!
 
We hope that you are returning to work fully-charged and ready to take on 2019.
 
This year we have a new Victorian branch committee with office-holders and general members as follows:
 
  • Chair               Gail Iles (RMIT)
  • Vice-Chair      Daniel Langley (Swinburne)
  • Secretary       Matthew Lay (FB Rice)
  • Treasurer       Geoffrey Cousland (Melbourne Uni.)
  • General          Amanda Perdomo (Royal Children’s Hospital),                                                                          Mark Edmonds (Monash), John Thornton (DST),                                                                      Anton Tadich (Australian Synchrotron)
We are planning lots of exciting events this year, allowing you to make full use of your membership, and to bring your friends and colleagues to public events too. 
 
  • February: Professor Elisabetta Barberio (University of Melbourne) will deliver the BOAS Medal lecture coinciding with the AIP AGM
  • March: we will have a stand within the Victorian Government pavilion at the Avalon Airshow.  Many physicists are also pilots, aspiring or otherwise, so this is a good opportunity to combine physics, fun and flying. 
  • April: we will have a talk by the Lead Scientist for Victoria, Amanda Caples, with a members-only event afterwards, giving you the chance to talk to Amanda directly.
 
For dates, locations and updates, please check the website regularly and/or follow us on twitter or Facebook.
Twitter:              https://twitter.com/AIPVicBranch/
 
The committee will be meeting regularly throughout 2019 and we are always happy to hear suggestions for events that you – the members – would like to see offered.
 
Wishing you all the best for a fruitful 2019,
 
Kind regards,
Gail
 
Branch Chair – Australian Institute of Physics (Victoria)

2018 Annual General Meeting QLD Branch – Room Change

Please take note, we have incorporated a room change so that there will be better amenities to account for our online viewers!

The new location will be:

Parnell Building: Room 7-302

The link to join us online is available below.

 

Members of the Australian Institute of Physics, Queensland Branch.

 

You are invited to attend the upcoming Annual General Meeting .

The AGM will be held on the 2 November from 4pm – 6pm, Room 50-S201, University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus.

I am very pleased to announce that we will have two speakers bracketing the AGM, with the QLD nominee for the Bragg Gold Medal Dr Sarah Walden presenting her research; and the John Mainstone Youth lecture Tour presenter Dr Sean Powell.  More information about their presentations are provided below.

The expected timing of the proceedings will be as follows:

4.00pm – 4.50pm      Dr Sarah Walden presents her research

5.00pm – 5.15pm      AGM

5.15pm – 6.00pm      Dr Sean Powell – “Physics is everywhere!”  Presentation from the John Mainstone Youth Lecture Tour.

For catering purposes it would be appreciated if you could register your attendance by Tuesday the 30th of October  to aip_branchsecretary_qld@aip.org.au . Catering will involve pizza and cold drinks.

 

We additionally hope to stream the presentation online using the zoom platform. You can join us at AEST 4pm-6pm here.

 

Additionally, part of the business for the AGM will be to elect the branch committee for 2019.

 

As per the AIP by-laws, the retiring committee has made nominations for next year’s committee, and these are listed below:

 

Joel Alroe (Chair) (QUT),

Joanna Turner  (Secretary) (USQ),

Scott Adamson (Vice-Chair) (All Hallows),

Igor Litvinyuk (Treasurer) (GU),

Simon Critchley (Qld Health),

Austin Lund (UQ),

Nunzio Motta (QUT),

Carolyn Brown (USQ),

Till Weinhold (UQ)

Jacinda Ginges (UQ)

Scott Hoffman (post-graduate student representative UQ)

 

Members may make further nominations, which need to be duly proposed and seconded and forwarded to the Secretary at least 24 hours before the AGM, directed to aip_branchsecretary_qld@aip.org.au . I look forward to seeing you on 2nd November!

 

Dr Sarah Walden

Title: Nonlinear optical properties of ZnO and ZnO-Au composite nanostructures for nanoscale UV emission

Abstract: This thesis investigates the nonlinear optical properties of ZnO and ZnO-Au composite nanostructures. For applications such as photodynamic therapy, it is desirable to use nanoparticles to generate localised UV emission while illuminating them with visible or infrared light. This is possible using nonlinear optical processes such as two photon absorption. Nonlinear optical processes however, are extremely weak, so this work investigates the potential of increasing the efficiency of two photon absorption in ZnO nanoparticles by coupling them to metal nanoparticles. Using new experimental methods, the two photon absorption and resulting UV emission from the nanoparticles are measured.

Dr Sean Powell

Physics is everywhere! – a journey from sub-atomic particles to the large-scale structure of the universe, where physics seeks to answer the most fundamental questions about reality. As we learn more, we can do more! Physics is everywhere in our world and underpins all our technologies. This year, Sean will discuss the important problems that all of us encounter every day: how do I teleport myself to school? What do I do when I find myself inside a black hole? Why is my time-machine not working? He will also talk about the superpowers that you can gain as a physicist, such as the ability to make accurate quantitative observations and predictive and interpretive mathematical models.  These powers mean that you can become very valuable and work in many industries such as fundamental physics research, economics and finance, space and aeronautics, healthcare and medicine, learning and teaching, electronics and computers, and so much more!