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PUBLIC LECTURE – 22 AUGUST 2017

2017 Alexander and Leicester McAulay Winter Lecture Series

Australian Institute of Physics – Tasmanian Branch

Measuring Radiation Doses in 3-D with Polymer Gel Dosimeters

Tuesday 22 August 2017, 8.00-9.00 pm
Physics lecture Theatre 1
University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Hobart

 

Professor Clive Baldock
University of Tasmania

Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record clinical radiotherapy (radiation therapy) radiation dose distributions in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry will be reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry will be presented.

Meet the John Mainstone Youth Lecture Tour Speakers

The 2017 AIP Lecture Series will be delivered by Dr Helen Maynard-Casely.

 

Helen Maynard-Casely is a Planetary Scientist based at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) where she uses the neutrons and synchrotron x-rays to investigate the materials that make up our solar system.  She has a PhD in high-pressure physics from the University of Edinburgh and has been lucky enough to have collected data in facilities all over the world, blowing up a few diamonds along the way.  Always keen to tell anyone who’ll listen about planetary science, she writes a column ‘The Tides of Venus’ for The Conversation and tweets @Helen_E_MC.

Helen’s talk “Journeying to the centres of the planets” takes us on a journey, not just to visit the planets of our solar system, but to get to know them more intimately though understanding their varied and downright dangerous insides.  We’ve yet to actually dive under the clouds of the gas giants, crack through the ice of the dwarf planets or drill into the rocks of the terrestrial planets – so how do we know what lies beneath planetary surfaces?

An additional regional lecture will be delivered in Mount Isa in 2017 by Dr Sean Powell. Sean Powell’s research experience is in theoretical and computational modelling of particle dynamics and diffusion and MRI characterisation of diffusion in complex pore spaces. In addition, Sean has industry experience in computer software and hardware engineering, 3D visualisation systems, and solar thermal energy research. Presently, he leads the biofabrication research team within the Biofabrication and Tissue Morphology research group at the Queensland University of Technology. His quantitative and problem solving skills as a physicist complement those of the multi-disciplinary team of biologists, organic chemists, clinicians and medical engineers. He is also passionate about learning and teaching and lectures undergraduate physics at all year levels from introductory to advanced.

John Mainstone Youth Lecture Tour 2017

This year’s AIP youth lecture tour will promote physics to senior high school students and science teachers in a selection of regional centres throughout Queensland.

Commencing in August, Dr Helen Maynard-Casely and Dr Sean Powell will present their lectures in major centres across Queensland.

 

Scroll down to see if they are coming to a school near you!

Event Date City Venue and time
1 Tuesday 8 August Brisbane City, Brisbane

 

Mary Place Level 1

All Hallows’ School

547 Ann Street, Brisbane

3:30 pm for 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Local Host Organiser: Mr Sean Lynch

Sean.Lynch@ahs.qld.edu.au

P: 07 3230 9509

2 Wednesday 9 August

 

Nathan, Brisbane

 

N78_0.11 Lecture Theatre

Griffith University,

Nathan Campus

1:30 pm for 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Local Host Organiser: Nathalie Ferquel

n.ferquel@griffith.edu.au

P: 07 3735 7439

3 Thursday 10 August

 

Toowoomba

 

Lecture Theatre R113

University of Southern Queensland

Toowoomba Campus

1:00 pm for 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Local Host Organiser: Ms Karlee Kuzma

Karlee.Kuzma@usq.edu.au

P: 07 3470 4296

4 Friday 11 August

 

Sunshine Coast

 

Ken Thamm Centre Lecture Theatre

Immanuel Lutheran College

Wises Road, Buderim

10:45 am for 11:15 am – 12:15 pm

Local Host Organiser: Mrs Cheryl Fillmore

fillmorec@immanuel.qld.edu.au

P: 07 5477 3467

5 Thursday 17 August Townsville

 

Flexible Learning Area
St Margaret Mary’s College

Crowle Street, Hyde Park

1:00 pm for 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Local Host Organiser: Mr Theo Koulakis

tkoulakis@smmc.catholic.edu.au

P: 07 4726 4900

6 Friday 18 August Cairns

 

The Auditorium

Redlynch State College

Jungara Road, Redlynch

1:00 pm for 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Local Host Organiser: Ms Allison Sneddon

asned2@eq.edu.au

P: 07 4039 9222

       
+1 Monday 7 August Mount Isa* Multimedia Centre

Spinifex College, Mount Isa2:00 pm for 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

*Guest lecture delivered by Sean Powell in 2017

Local Host Organiser: Mr Grant Salmond

gsalm6@eq.edu.auP: 07 4744 7222

WIP Public Lecture 2017

“Dispatches from a Dark Universe”

Presented by Dr Katie Mack, University of Melbourne

The Victorian Branch is delighted to announce the Women in Physics public lecture for 2017, “Dispatches from a Dark Universe”, presented by Dr Katie Mack of the University of Melbourne.

 

When: Tuesday 15th August 2017, 6:30pm – 7:30pm

Where: Laby Theatre, David Caro Building, University of Melbourne

https://maps.unimelb.edu.au/parkville/building/192s/laby_theatre

 Light refreshments provided from 6pm

 Abstract:

There’s more to the Universe than we can see – even more than we can ever see. I’ll give a tour of the edges of our knowledge of the cosmos, including where the frontiers are, and what might remain unknowable forever. Come for the Big Bang, stay for the possibility of the ultimate destruction of all of reality.

About the speaker:

katie

Dr Katherine (Katie) Mack is a theoretical astrophysicist. Her work focuses on finding new ways to learn about the early universe and fundamental physics using astronomical observations, probing the building blocks of nature by examining the cosmos on the largest scales. Throughout her career as a researcher at Caltech, Princeton, Cambridge, and now Melbourne University, she has studied dark matter, black holes, cosmic strings, and the formation of the first galaxies in the Universe. Katie is also an active science communicator and is passionate about science outreach. As a science writer, she has been published by Slate, Sky & Telescope, Scientific American, and other popular publications, and has been a columnist for Cosmos Magazine.

Registration

As this event is expected to attract a number of people, in order to plan for catering it would be ideal if you could register via the following Google Forms link:

https://goo.gl/forms/nHPxwRyKn36FMivb2

We look forward to seeing you all there!

Anton Tadich

AIP Victorian Branch Chair

Katie_Up

Dr Katie Mack – Women in Physics Lecture Tour 2017 – VIC 14 -15 August

Dr Katie Mack is the Women in Physics Lecturer for 2017.

See if she is coming to a location near you!

 

14th August – Bendigo, Victoria

Event: Public lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: La Trobe University

When: 12.00pm

 

15th August – Bundoora and Melbourne, Victoria

Event: Girls In Physics Breakfast

Topic: Everything you wanted to know about Dark Matter but were afraid to ask.

Where: La Trobe University, Bundoora

When: 7am

 

Event: Public Lecture

Topic: Dispatches from a Dark Universe

Where: The Laby Lecture Theatre, University of Melbourne

When: 6.30pm

Dr Katie Mack – Women in Physics Lecture Tour 2017 – TAS & SA 7 -11 August

Dr Katie Mack is the Women in Physics Lecturer for 2017.

See if she is coming to a location near you!

 

7th August – Devonport and Launceston, Tasmania

Event: School Lecture

Topic: Dispatches from a Dark Universe

Where: Don College

When: 8.45am

 

Event: School Lecture

Topic: Everything you wanted to know about Dark Matter but were afraid to ask

Where: Launceston College

When: 1.00pm

 

8th August – Hobart, Tasmania

Event: School Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: Elizabeth College

When: 9.00am – 10.00am

 

Event: School Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: The Friend’s School – The Farrall Centre

When: 12.00pm – 12.45pm

 

Event: Public Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: Physics Lecture Theatre 1, Sandy Bay Campus, University of Tasmania

When: 8.00pm

 

9th August – Hobart, Tasmania

Event: School Lecture

Topic: TBA

Where: Taroona State High School

When: 9.40am

 

Event: School Lecture

Topic: TBA

Where: Ogilvie High School

When: 11.40am

 

10th August – Adelaide, South Australia

Event: School Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: Eastern Fleurieu School

When: 10.00am

 

Event: Afternoon Tea

Topic: STEM women

Where: Physical and Chemical Sciences Tea Room, Flinders University

When: 2.00pm-3.00pm

 

Event: Public Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: University of Adelaide, Napier G04

When: 7.30pm

 

11th August – Adelaide, South Australia

Event: Department Colloquium

Topic: Everything you wanted to know about Dark Matter but were afraid to ask.

Where: Physics Building Room 121, University of Adelaide

When: 12.00pm-1.00pm

 

 

 

Dr Katie Mack – Women in Physics Lecture Tour – NSW – 31st July to 3rd August

Dr Katie Mack is the Women in Physics Lecturer for 2017.

See if she is coming to a location near you!

 

31st July – Newcastle, New South Wales

Event: School Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: Mereweather High School

When: 11.00am

 

Event: School Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: Newcastle – School not specified

When: 1.00pm

 

1st August – Wollongong, New South Wales

 Event: School Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: St Mary’s, Star of the Sea College

When: 1.30pm

 

Event: Public Lecture

Topic: Everything you wanted to know about Dark Matter but were afraid to ask.

Where: Wollongong Science Centre and Planetarium, 60 Squires Way, North Wollongong

When: 6.30pm – 7.30pm

 

2nd August – Sydney, New South Wales

Event: School Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: Knox Grammar School, Wahroonga.

When: 12.00pm

 

Event: UNSW WIP Lecture 2017 

Topic: Everything you wanted to know about Dark Matter but were afraid to ask

Where: John Niland Scientia Building, University of New South Wales

When: 6pm

 

3rd August – Sydney, New South Wales

Event: Macquarie University WIP Lecture 2017

Topic: Everything you wanted to know about Dark Matter but were afraid to ask.

Where: Macquarie University, W5A, T2.

When: 12.00pm – 1.00pm

Dr Katie Mack – Women in Physics Lecture Tour – QLD & ACT 24-28 July

Dr Katie Mack is the  2017 Women in Physics Lecturer. 

 See if she coming to a location near you!

 

24th July – Toowoomba, Queensland

Event: Student Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: R113, University of Southern Queensland

When: 1.15 – 2.15 pm

 

Event: Public Lecture

Topic: Dispatches from a Dark Universe

Where: R113, University of Southern Queensland

When: 5.30pm – 6.30 pm

 

25th July, Ipswich and Brisbane, Queensland

Event: School Lecture

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: Bundamba State Secondary College

When: 10.15am-11.15

 

Event: School Lecture and Q&A

Topic: TBA

Where: MacGregor State High School

When: 1pm-2.30pm

 

26th July, Brisbane, Queensland

Event: UQ Colloquium

Topic: Dark Matter, First Light

Where: Room 67-142, UQ – St Lucia campus

When: 1.00pm-2.00pm

 

27th July, Canberra, ACT

Event: Girls In Physics Breakfast

Topic: A Tour of the Universe (And Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Where: ANU Physics Link Building #38A Ground floor (Enter from the union court side of the building.)

When: 7am – 8.45am

 

Event: Public Lecture

Topic: Everything you wanted to know about Dark Matter but were afraid to ask.

Where: Western Theatre, ANU Campus

When: 7pm

 

28th July – Canberra, ACT

Event: School Lecture

Topic: Dispatches from a Dark Universe

Where: Melba Copland School

When: 9.00am – 11.00am

 

Event: School Lecture

Topic: Dispatches from a Dark Universe

Where: Radford College

When: 12.45pm – 1.45pm

 

Event: School Lecture

Topic: Dispatches from a Dark Universe

Where: Canberra Girls Grammar

When: 2.30pm – 4.00pm

PUBLIC LECTURE – 8 AUGUST 2017

2017 Alexander and Leicester McAulay Winter Lecture Series

2017 AIP Women in Physics Lecture

2017 National Science Week

Australian Institute of Physics – Tasmanian Branch

A Tour of the Universe (and Selected Cosmic Mysteries)

Tuesday 8 August 2017, 8.00-9.00 pm
Physics lecture Theatre 1
University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Hobart

 

Dr Katie Mack
University of Melbourne

Everything humanity has ever seen or experienced represents a tiny speck in a vast and mysterious Universe. What else is out there, and how are we figuring it out? What puzzles wait to be solved? Come with your questions about dark matter, dark energy, black holes, or the ultimate fate of the Universe as we delve into some of cosmology’s most fundamental questions.

Further details: Simon Ellingsen (T 03 6226 7588, E aip_branchsecretary_tas@aip.org.au)

http://www.events.utas.edu.au/2017/august/a-tour-of-the-universe-and-selected-cosmic-mysteries

 

PUBLIC LECTURE – 27 JULY 2017

2017 Alexander and Leicester McAulay Winter Lecture Series

Australian Institute of Physics – Tasmanian Branch

The Physics of ITER and Fusion Power

Thursday 27 July 2017, 8.00-9.00 pm
Physics lecture Theatre 1
University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Hobart

 

Associate Professor Matthew Hole
Australian National University

Assuming energy security and stability will always demand some base-load power stations on the grid our children and grandchildren will use, what will provide the heat to boil the water? The most attractive and yet elusive alternative to the chemical burning of carbonaceous fossil fuels and the nuclear fission of the rare heavy nuclei left over from supernovae has long been the nuclear fusion of the light nuclei left over from the big bang, still by far the most common form of ordinary matter.

Spawned by Reagan and Gorbachev as a grand international collaboration to thaw the cold war, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which is now under construction, is the final step towards a demonstration power plant.

ITER heralds a new era in fusion research. Over 70MW of auxiliary heating will be used to initiate fusion events producing 500MW of fusion power. Temperatures will range from near absolute zero in the superconducting cryostat to 10 times hotter than the core of the Sun. The plasma volume approaches that of an Olympic swimming pool, and it will carry 15 MA of current, more than the current in 500 lightning bolts. The machine itself will weigh 23,000 tons, or about half the weight of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

ITER’s research goal is to explore the uncharted physics of burning plasmas, in which the energy liberated from the confined products of reaction exceeds the energy invested in heating the plasma. To access these conditions, ITER will rely critically on external heating methods such as neutral beam injection. ITER will also feature fully 3D asymmetric field structure, imposed to mitigate performance limiting edge localised modes.

In this talk I will outline fusion-relevant research across Australia, and highlight ANU-led extensions to ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Ideal MHD, which is an enabling science of astrophysical plasmas, forms most of the physics basis for ITER.

Further details: Andrew Klekociuk (M 0418 323 341, E aip_branchsecretary_tas@aip.org.au)

http://www.events.utas.edu.au/2017/july/the-physics-of-iter-and-fusion-power