All posts by aipWPEditor

PUBLIC LECTURE – 7 JUNE 2018

2018 Alexander and Leicester McAulay Winter Lecture Series

Australian Institute of Physics – Tasmanian Branch

Glitch – Investigating the densest matter in the universe: The 2016 glitch of the Vela pulsar

Thursday 7 June 2018, 8.00-9.00 pm
Physics Lecture Theatre 1
University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Hobart

 

Jim Palfreyman
School of Natural Sciences, University of Tasmania

Pulsars are neutron stars that are the remnants of supernova explosions. They are highly dense and rotate rapidly, some with accuracy better than atomic clocks. The Vela pulsar famously “glitches” or speeds up in rotation roughly every three years. No glitch has ever been observed in-action with a radio telescope large enough to see individual pulses, until now. Some remarkable events occurred and these will be covered in detail. The presentation will be aimed at people who have a general interest in astronomy.

Further details: Andrew Klekociuk (T 0418 323 341, E aip_branchsecretary_tas@aip.org.au)

International Day of Light Public Lecture

6:30 pm, Wednesday 16th May 2018

Napier 102 lecture theatre, Napier Building,
University of Adelaide (North Terrace campus)

Heike Ebendofff-HeidepriemLight for Extra-Sensory Perception

 

Professor Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem

Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS),
ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP),
The University of Adelaide

Abstract

Photonics is a disruptive technology whose impact and potential to transform industry and our lives has been likened to those of electronics. We all use photonics enabled devices every day such as lasers, sensors and optical fibres, even without realising it. The global photonics market is currently worth around USD$500 billion and is expected to grow to over US$600 billion by 2023, which makes physics and photonics a very attractive prospect to join this locally and internationally growing high-tech industry.

This talk will explore the different approaches and devices used for harnessing light to measure the world around us, for example temperature, magnetic fields, gravity, corrosion and much more.

Biography

Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem received the Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the University of Jena, Germany, in 1994. She subsequently held two prestigious fellowships and received the Weyl International Glass Science Award in 2001. During 2001-2004 she was with the Optoelectronics Research Centre at the University of Southampton, UK. Since 2005, she has been with the University of Adelaide, Australia. Currently, she leads the Glass and Fibre Group and is the Deputy Director of the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing. Her research focuses on the development of novel optical glasses, fibres, surface functionalization and sensing approaches.

PUBLIC LECTURE – 10 May 2018

2018 Alexander and Leicester McAulay Winter Lecture Series

Australian Institute of Physics – Tasmanian Branch

Shedding light on dark matter

Thursday 10 May 2018, 8.00-9.00 pm
Physics Lecture Theatre 1
University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Hobart

 

Professor Chris Power
International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia

A standard cosmological model has emerged over the last 30 or so years in which the matter content of the Universe is predominantly in the form of an exotic non-baryonic matter, quite unlike the ordinary matter of everyday experience. Uncovering the physical nature of this dark matter is one of the most pressing problems facing fundamental physics and cosmology in the 21st century.

Astronomical observations and modelling have played a key role in establishing what we think we know so far about the dark matter – the widely favoured Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model predicts successfully the large-scale distribution of galaxies in a cosmic web, and is consistent with our deepest observations of the early Universe, which show that galaxies, groups, and cluster are the product of mergers over the last 13 or so billion years of cosmic time. The CDM model is not without its problems, however, and, in particular, it is on the smallest galactic mass scales of dwarfs and satellites of the kind we find around the Milky Way that it has faced its most severe challenges.

I will review what the latest observations and numerical simulations are telling us about dark matter, and I will speculate on what we might learn in the coming years, especially as observation, theory, and experiment place more stringent limits on what the dark matter can be.

Further details: Andrew Klekociuk (T 0418 323 341, E aip_branchsecretary_tas@aip.org.au)

PUBLIC LECTURE – 10 APRIL 2018

2018 Alexander and Leicester McAulay Winter Lecture Series

Australian Institute of Physics – Tasmanian Branch

From Mad Scientists to Eco-Warriors: The changing image of scientists in fiction and film

Tuesday 10 April 2018, 8.00-9.00 pm
Physics Lecture Theatre 1
University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Hobart

 

Adjunct Associate Professor Roslynn Haynes
School of English, Media and Performing Arts, University of New South Wales

For approximately 600 years, from 1380 to 1980, scientists or their predecessors, the alchemists and natural philosophers, fared ill at the hands of writers and, later, film makers.

They were obsessed to the point of madness, or evil, amoral, arrogant, impersonal, and inhuman. At best, they were well intentioned but blind to the dangers of forces they barely controlled. They were Faustus and Frankenstein, Jekyll and Moreau, Caligari and Strangelove – the scientists of film and fiction, cultural archetypes that reflected ancient fears of tampering with the unknown or unleashing the little-understood powers of nature.

Yet, since the 1990s, there has been a trend by novelists to present scientists as more complex, realistic figures, many honest and admirable even if confused as to their role. They are eco-warriors saving the planet, or medical researchers discovering new cures for humanity. However, in films, the mad, evil stereotype endures. What are the reasons for this disparity?  What do they teach us about the difficulties scientists have in convincing politicians and large sections of society of the need to take environmental pollution and climate change seriously?

Further details: Andrew Klekociuk (T 0418 323 341, E aip_branchsecretary_tas@aip.org.au)

http://www.events.utas.edu.au/2018/april/from-mad-scientists-to-eco-warriors-the-changing-image-of-scientists-in-fiction-and-film

NSWAIP Branch Talk – ANSTO Discovery Centre (Tues 26 June)

On Tuesday 26 June, the Australian Institute of Physics NSW Branch | Royal Australian Chemical Institute | The Royal Society of New South Wales | Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation presents BIG Science. Exploring the future of the world’s most exciting STEM challenges and developments at this year’s combined event.

Details

When: Tuesday 26 June 2018

Where: ANSTO Discover Centre, New Illawarra Road Lucas Heights

Speaker: Professor Richard Garrett – Senior Advisor, Strategic Projects and Manager, Industry and External Engagement at ANSTO

Cost FREE.

Bookings Essential: bigsciencecombinedmeeting.eventbrite.com.au

RSVP required by 22 June 2018

Program

Optional tour of the Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering: 5.00pm – 6.00pm

Refreshments: 6.00pm – 6.30pm    Presentation: 6.30pm – 7.30pm

Optional dinner at RockSalt, 1/72-80 Allison Crescent, Menai ($50 pp.): 8.00pm

 Enquiries: Dr Frederick Osman on fosman@trinity.nsw.edu.au or refer to the attached flyer

Big Science Combined Meeting POSTER FINALPresented by the Australian Institute of Physics New South Wales Branch | Royal Australian Chemical Institute | The Royal Society of New South Wales | Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation

 

 

Bronze Bragg Presentation and Free Public Lecture

6:30 pm, Thursday February 22nd 2018

 Napier 102 lecture theatre,
Napier Building, University of Adelaide (North Terrace campus)

 

DavidOttawayGravitational Wave Detection and the Birth of Multi Messenger Astronomy”

Prof. David Ottaway,
University of Adelaide

 

Abstract:

The existence of gravitational waves was first predicted by Albert Einstein as a direct consequence of his Theory of General Relativity. These waves were first directly detected on Earth a little more than 2 years ago. These waves were created by the collision between two black holes that occurred over a billion years ago. The significance of this detection was celebrated with the awarding of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics to Weiss, Barish and Thorne. Further detections have helped solve the mystery of how gold and other heavy elements are created in the Universe. In this talk I will present an overview of the field of gravitational wave detection and how this has led to the opening of a new window on the universe.

BronzeBraggMedal

 

 

The Bronze Bragg medals and merit certificates will be presented at the lecture.

 

The medal is awarded for highest achievement in Physics in 2017 in the SACE Stage 2 assessments, with certificates being for students who achieved a merit.

Welcome to an exciting NSWAIP 2018

Welcome to the website of the NSW branch of the Australian Institute of Physics. The NSW branch is very active and this will indeed be an exciting year.

AIP NSW Office Bearers for 2018:

Chair: Dr Fred Osman

Deputy Chair: Dr Graeme Melville (listen to some of his radio interviews: Exoplanets;   Earth’s Pole Reversal.

Secretary: Associate Professor Matthew Arnold

Treasurer: Dr Phil Burns

Committee Member: Dr Scott Martin

Committee Member: Associate Professor Michael Lerch

Committee Member: Mrs Erin Munn

Committee Member: Mr Robert Raposio

Committee Member: Dr Timothy Van der Laan

Website Manager: Dr Graeme Melville

Please view our calendar and details of coming and past events below. More details will become available as we get closer to the event.

2018 Event Dates: 

  • AIP seminar 13th Mar: Cathy Foley on superconductivity: Details in Pdf.
  • AIP / STANSW Physics Teachers Conference 15 June at UTS – details to follow.
  • ANSTO Visit: Tues 26 June.
  • AIP / RACI Joint Seminar: Tuesday 1 August.
  • WIP Lectures – Details to follow.
  • Einstein Lecture 2018: Tuesday 14 August 6 pm. Public Lecture at UNSW with Prof Michelle Simmons (2018 Australian of the Year) as the speaker. Details to follow.
  • AIP Physics in the Pub: New date – Friday 17 August. Details in Pdf.
  • AIP Industry Day:  Thursday 1 November – details to follow.
  • AIP Postgraduate Awards + AGM:Tuesday 13 November at the UNSW, School of Physics. Details to follow

Hope to see many people at our spectacular events this year.

Student Prizes

The NSWAIP gives out a number of  prizes each year including:

2017 Events :

2017 Community Outreach to Physics Award – this has been won by astronomer Dr Ragbir Bhathal from UWS and will be presented at 6 pm at the Postgraduate Awards Ceremony at UNSW on the 14 Nov. Congratulations Ragbir.

2017 Tasmanian Branch Public Lecture Recordings

Thanks so much to the speakers who presented our winter series lectures this year. Here are links to recordings if you were not able to attend or would like to revisit the talks (apologies for some glitches):

https://echo360.org.au/…/f288734f-dd86-4db6-acd1-b74…/public (Sue Cook, 20 Sep – Giant Icebergs)

https://echo360.org.au/…/f72c9681-6279-48f7-aba9-125…/public (Clive Baldock, 22 Aug – Radiation)

https://echo360.org.au/…/b6997c3d-40b7-453f-9612-3ff…/public (Katie Mack, 8 Aug – Universe, AUDIO ONLY + video of Katie talking, but no slides)

https://echo360.org.au/…/e5958f39-65e9-48e6-ac3c-aca…/public (Matthew Hole, 27 Jul – Fusion)

https://echo360.org.au/…/46c71f35-84ba-4ec9-bbb0-c81…/public (David Jamieson, 17 May – Power)

https://echo360.org.au/…/faee3c5b-524e-4eca-bf5f-ef9…/public (Nick Seymour, 6 Apr – Big Telescope, AUDIO ONLY)